If you want to build your art collection, you should do so in an intelligent manner. This is so that everything you buy for your collection wouldn’t be considered as a waste of money. However, collecting art intelligibly would require you to master two things: good research skills and the skill of collecting.

Starting On The Thought Of Collecting

Generally, as most people do, you’d probably have the knowledge of buying art on a piece-per-piece basis, yet still may not be thinking of plans like making multiple achievements as time passes by, or simply, building up a collection.

Although it is possible to find artworks that you like anywhere you go, and get to choose from an outstanding diversity of subject matters, mediums, and price ranges; doing so can still be confusing and intimidating, especially if you’re still starting.

Questions such as: “How exactly do you push your way through and choose which direction to make an entrance?” “How can you relate one buy to the other?”;”How should you group or organize your art?”; “Are there ways of presenting it?”; and lastly “How can you do everything in an excellent manner?”; may come play in your mind.

However, once you get these queries off you head then you’ll get to understand the real meaning of “collection”, which is the crucial case of controlled and purposeful buying.


The Great Collections

Great collectors are extensively respected and usually as popular as the artworks they collect; such as the Rockefeller collection, the Chrysler collection, and the Phillips collection, to name a few. Such collectors are famous since they demonstrate a great deal of talent when choosing and organizing their art, just like the artists themselves are in making the masterpiece. Similarly, each piece of art in one great collection orders first-class attention as well as a first-rate price not just because the piece is good, but also of the name of the company it bears.

If you wish to know more about the great collections, I suggest you have a look at Modern Art on Display: The Legacies of Six Collectors, by K. Porter Aichele. 

I came across this book randomly on Amazon some time ago. I liked it the moment it reached my doorstep as it looks at art collecting in the twentieth as a complex game of finance, instinct but above all knowledge and culture. In a few words, it explores the theory that collectors of modern art in the first half of the twentieth century had more than financial means, keen instincts, and unflappable gumption: they had the ambition to learn about the art they collected.

How Great Is ‘Great’?

So how exactly do great collectors become great? Well, experts believe that it is this skill of being able to categorize specific artworks from the billions of works existing and assemble them in such a manner aiming to advance or increase other’s understanding of such particular art or of art’s evolution in general.

For any kind of mature collection, the whole thing, as a group, becomes greater than the value of the parts. Thus, the collector becomes accepted to be a respected authority in the matter and in outstanding cases continues until he’s the one that sets the standards, establishes the trends, and influences the future of art collecting for all.

This is how meaningful and influencing great art collections can be. It all starts from a single piece of art, until the whole collection itself becomes a separate artwork from its components.

If the topic of how collectors influence the value of art and how fortunes are made in the market of fine art interest you, I recommend this book: FINE ART AND HIGHT FINANCE by Clare McAndrew. This reading opened to me a massive window on what is nowadays known as ‘The Art Economy’ and enriched me with useful insights on valuation, trend and marketing in the almost impenetrable world of fine art.


The First Step To Greatness: art needs you as much as you need art

No matter how you see your collecting, whether recreational or serious, there are methods that you could use to get the most out of not only the value and quality of your art, but also your personal appreciation, enjoyment, and understanding of your art.

Thus, you should know that your first step to greatness is being real to your tastes. If you want to be a really great collector someday, then acknowledging and accepting that you like specific types of art without considering what other people say or what is popular in the market, would be the right thing to do.

Remember, in collecting, you’re making an artwork too which is composed of different specific pieces. How you’ll design your artwork is entirely up to you and not what other people think. So if you’ll be collecting , be sure to put your heart on it! And who knows…maybe your instinct and taste will lead you to purchase the future Picasso…

Nicholas Tan; Victoria Schaal

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Level Up Conference in KL 2018: Report

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Last week I had the chance to attend the famous Level Up conference in Kuala Lumpur.

The atmosphere at Level Up was truly electrifying. Seeing all these youngsters showing their artistic creations was absolutely marvellous.

The conference talks were held by a plethora of speakers from a wide range of backgrounds within the gaming, digital art, software and hardware industries.

I found particularly interesting the presentation given by HTC regarding VR and their future intentions for the new technology. The speech was quite technical but luckily I had gone to a VR lab the week prior to Level Up to try it out as I wrote in my previous article. My first experience was quite…..hilarious. If you’re interested in seeing a ridiculous girl pretending to ski in VR and falling by herself, click here to watch the video.

A disappointment, however, arises from the lack of debate regarding the ‘side effects’ of VR.

We do not know how the human psychology will react once VR is easily accessible to everyone or even a future commonly found at home tech, like they all seemed to predict at Level Up. Controversial studies have been carried out and subsequent correlations have already been found between violent videogames and real life aggression. And this was with 2D on screen games, so what’s it going to be with VR games? And we also have lots of cases of gaming addiction, particularly in Asia where bootcamps are held for rehab from technology. So what’s going to happen with VR in the mix too?

I loved some of the games that were exhibited and was mesmerised by the new Prestige range of MSI laptops. In fact, I am very tempted to buy the P42: such a powerful laptop and yet so thin and light. A masterpiece truly. If you’re interested, you can have a look at its features here. After all, both 11.11 and Black Friday/CyberMonday are getting close so we won’t feel to guilty to buy a new toy if it’s discounted!

So all in all, the success of Level Up is totally justified. It was well organised, the location very neat and pleasant, the crowd quite varied and the speakers capable.

But to me, the best of Level Up was seeing so many young minds attending, each showing a great passion and a strong will to succeed in an increasingly competitive environment like gaming, apps and digital art.

In a way a contradictory but also reassuring observation I made was that several of these digital talents were still sketching on paper all the time, even during talks. It is nice to see that art evolves but the starting point remains traditional: the hand sketch.

VR, my first time: amazing but disturbing

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I live in Kuala Lumpur and at this time of the year the monsoon hits us hard especially during the afternoons and evenings. The rain floods streets and the humid heat renders the air stale and tiring.

So what to do on a Saturday night in this weather? Go to spend an hour at the VR lab.

Last Saturday was my first time (VR-wise) and my boyfriend suggested a ski game to, as he put it, ‘experience fully the power of VR‘. Sure. Why not.

As I was ‘experiencing fully’ the thing, he decided to film me in one of the most ridiculous moments of my young life. You can see it too here.

In conclusion, I found VR to be an extrordinary thing. It’s incredible how effectively real everything feels. I say feels and not looks, as it’s not the graphics that make you believe you’re in other dimension. It’s the whole interaction between the visual illusion and your brain that drives you nuts.

I did feel nausea when jumping on my skis, scared when some snakes tried to eat me, tired after a pub fight and I had a strong headache afterward. But it was totally worth a try and I will likely go again some time.

Yet, I cannot prevent myself from thinking about the potential consequences of VR on human psychology. Using it an hour at an arcade is no biggie but VR will likely become more and more affordable and am sure a good portion of the population will end up having it at home, always accessible.
Controversial studies and correlations have already been made regarding violent screen-videogames and real life aggression. And we also have lots of cases of gaming addiction, particularly in Asia where bootcamps are also held for rehab from technology. So what’s going to happen with VR in the mix too? How many individuals will prefer the virtual reality they build themselfves to their actual lives?

How many people who may already be prone to addicition, violence or psychological trouble will lose their minds with VR?

This is not a criticism. I leave these questions open as I am clueless of what’s going to happen. Yet, I do find that these questions are not asked enough.

Next week I’ll go to the Level Up Conference in KL and hope to find some answers.

Stock Photography Agency Employee: “It’s a gym for beginners!”

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Hi, I am a stock photographer. Actually, that is how my passion for photography started all together and  throughout the years lead me to become a visual artist and a stock photography agency employee. In fact, I am a marketing specialist for 123RF.

Stock photography is often criticised by the so called ‘real photographers’. Yet, I find such criticisms rather snobbish. Before becoming an artistic photographer, everyone needs practice. There are lots of things to learn: technical abilities, artistic skills, the creative market’ functioning and so on.

Money is also relevant. We don’t all know since the start that we want to take photography seriously or if we are able to. You can make some passive income by uploading your digital pictures to stock photography websites. Every time an image of yours is downloaded you earn a commission.

As a visual artist and a marketing expert for a stock photography agency, I strongly believe stock photography is a gym for beginners.

It enables you to draw some income to purchase your first gear, understand what the market is looking for, analyse what are the subjects you shoot best, keep high quality and technical standards and more.

It is also an excellent way to master technical abilities. Stock photography requires perfection. Contrasting the fine art world where rules are made to broken, if your picture is a little bit noisy or slightly out of focus, it will not be sellable as stock. This a good discipline for beginners who still have to learn how to respect rules before going onto the next level and learn how to break the rules.

There are numerous stock photography sites that need your photos. Numerous people, organizations, associations, sites and print distributions are in consistent need of a wide assortment of value photos for their sites, direct mail advertisements, handouts, magazines, recordings and daily papers. These substances consistently swing to stock photography sites to purchase the photos that they require.

Stock photography agencies will pay you a rate for each one of your photos that gets downloaded, each time it is downloaded. Your photos can be downloaded a boundless number of times.

You can present your computerized photos to sites Shutterstock and the agency for whom i work, 123RF. You don’t need to be an expert picture taker. You simply require a computerized camera (with additional memory cards) and web get to. Agreeing to accept these sites is free. Each time one of your photos is downloaded you’ll get paid a level of the cost of the photo, which for the most part comes to twenty-five pennies to a few dollars.

Pretty much any sort of computerized picture is acknowledged as long as it is of high caliber. Your photos should be in JPG/JPEG and for most stock sites they ought to be 1600 x 1200 pixels or bigger. New picture takers for Shutterstock need to submit photos that are 4.0 Megapixels or Million Pixels (MP). You can ascertain the quantity of pixels in a photo by increasing the width by the stature. A photo that is 1600×1200 is 1.92 million pixels.

In photos that portray a minor, or where an identifiable human face is unmistakable, you should send a model discharge with the photo to the site. You have to submit unique work and ensure that you do exclude copyrighted material or logos in your pictures. Try not to submit photos that have been expanded in estimate from their unique document measure. You should read the accommodation rules from every site before you begin posting your photos.

When you have transferred a photo to a stock photography site, it remains there for whatever length of time that you like (notwithstanding for quite a long time). Each time it gets downloaded you win cash. You can transfer your photos to a few unique sites as long as the sites permit the accommodation of non-restrictive photos.

You can take ten pictures every day and transfer every one to ten diverse stock photography sites. In only three months you’ll have around 900 photos transferred 9,000 times. What is extremely cool about this is before your photos are transferred they keep on making cash for you with no extra work on your part. In the event that you constantly transfer pictures to the stock sites you can win considerably more.

TIP: As a stock photography agency employee, I know that the first real milestone income-wise is having 1000 photos on sale. From that turning point, you will see a major change in your revenue. 

Yet, you don’t need to reach that amount to have some good surprises. When I had around 500 images on Shutterstock, I sold one for 44$ of commission in one sale… I was astounded! But this sort of unexpected surprises happens often and the more pics you have online, the more frequently you’ll get surprised.

The majority of the stock sites pay you once every month through PayPal, MoneyBookers, paper check or direct store.

Start by taking pictures in your general vicinity, or travel anyplace and bring home the bacon by taking stock photos. The more pictures you upload the all the more procuring potential you have. You can profit from this “employment” from pretty much anyplace on the planet.

Want me to refer you as a contributor and increase your chances to sell? Just follow this link: https://submit.shutterstock.com/?ref=3756818