If you want to build your art collection, you should do so in an intelligent manner. This is so that everything you buy for your collection wouldn’t be considered as a waste of money. However, collecting art intelligibly would require you to master two things: good research skills and the skill of collecting.

Starting On The Thought Of Collecting

Generally, as most people do, you’d probably have the knowledge of buying art on a piece-per-piece basis, yet still may not be thinking of plans like making multiple achievements as time passes by, or simply, building up a collection.

Although it is possible to find artworks that you like anywhere you go, and get to choose from an outstanding diversity of subject matters, mediums, and price ranges; doing so can still be confusing and intimidating, especially if you’re still starting.

Questions such as: “How exactly do you push your way through and choose which direction to make an entrance?” “How can you relate one buy to the other?”;”How should you group or organize your art?”; “Are there ways of presenting it?”; and lastly “How can you do everything in an excellent manner?”; may come play in your mind.

However, once you get these queries off you head then you’ll get to understand the real meaning of “collection”, which is the crucial case of controlled and purposeful buying.


The Great Collections

Great collectors are extensively respected and usually as popular as the artworks they collect; such as the Rockefeller collection, the Chrysler collection, and the Phillips collection, to name a few. Such collectors are famous since they demonstrate a great deal of talent when choosing and organizing their art, just like the artists themselves are in making the masterpiece. Similarly, each piece of art in one great collection orders first-class attention as well as a first-rate price not just because the piece is good, but also of the name of the company it bears.

If you wish to know more about the great collections, I suggest you have a look at Modern Art on Display: The Legacies of Six Collectors, by K. Porter Aichele. 

I came across this book randomly on Amazon some time ago. I liked it the moment it reached my doorstep as it looks at art collecting in the twentieth as a complex game of finance, instinct but above all knowledge and culture. In a few words, it explores the theory that collectors of modern art in the first half of the twentieth century had more than financial means, keen instincts, and unflappable gumption: they had the ambition to learn about the art they collected.

How Great Is ‘Great’?

So how exactly do great collectors become great? Well, experts believe that it is this skill of being able to categorize specific artworks from the billions of works existing and assemble them in such a manner aiming to advance or increase other’s understanding of such particular art or of art’s evolution in general.

For any kind of mature collection, the whole thing, as a group, becomes greater than the value of the parts. Thus, the collector becomes accepted to be a respected authority in the matter and in outstanding cases continues until he’s the one that sets the standards, establishes the trends, and influences the future of art collecting for all.

This is how meaningful and influencing great art collections can be. It all starts from a single piece of art, until the whole collection itself becomes a separate artwork from its components.

If the topic of how collectors influence the value of art and how fortunes are made in the market of fine art interest you, I recommend this book: FINE ART AND HIGHT FINANCE by Clare McAndrew. This reading opened to me a massive window on what is nowadays known as ‘The Art Economy’ and enriched me with useful insights on valuation, trend and marketing in the almost impenetrable world of fine art.


The First Step To Greatness: art needs you as much as you need art

No matter how you see your collecting, whether recreational or serious, there are methods that you could use to get the most out of not only the value and quality of your art, but also your personal appreciation, enjoyment, and understanding of your art.

Thus, you should know that your first step to greatness is being real to your tastes. If you want to be a really great collector someday, then acknowledging and accepting that you like specific types of art without considering what other people say or what is popular in the market, would be the right thing to do.

Remember, in collecting, you’re making an artwork too which is composed of different specific pieces. How you’ll design your artwork is entirely up to you and not what other people think. So if you’ll be collecting , be sure to put your heart on it! And who knows…maybe your instinct and taste will lead you to purchase the future Picasso…

Nicholas Tan; Victoria Schaal

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

”How Do You Like It?”: My New Book

In February 2019 I published my latest book:

HOW DO YOU LIKE IT?

Customer Services: Personalisation or Standardisation?

by Victoria Schaal

Abstract: This research faces two practical questions, which have arisen in the past decades and have not found a concrete solution yet: how do individuals expect customer services to be delivered and which is the most effective approach to retain customers.

The importance of customer retention is now widely recognised and the vital role of customer services in it has been agreed. Yet, the bridge that links customer services and customer retention is a field still mined by discussions and arguments.

Scholars depict two main approaches in order to retain consumers: standardisation and customisation. Although academics have produced extensive studies on these approaches and have evaluated both, none has gathered primary data on the matter in order to reach a more realistic, reliable and applicable conclusion.

This dissertation explores the numerous academic works, but also attempts to obtain results through the production of an inductive qualitative research aiming at interviewing consumers in order to discover concretely what are their preferences and the reasons behind their reactions and behaviours.

The results of the research provide concrete answers to this dissertation’s questions: they indicate the exact expectations customers’ have in relation to how customer services agents should serve them and illustrate how individuals’ favourite approach changes depending on subjective factors. Furthermore, this dissertation can serve as a basis for future studies on the topic, as well as represent a priceless starting point on which organisations may train their customer services. Based on academic theory and the research’s findings, it attempts to provide guidelines to create a successful training program for businesses aiming at customer services improvement and consumer retention.

Paperback: 130 pages  // Published: February 26, 2019 // Language: English // ISBN-10: 1798091860 // ISBN-13: 978-1798091869

Wherever you are in the world, get your copy on Amazon.com

Or if you’re in  -United Kingdom, get it on Amazon.co.uk  // -Italy, Amazon.it //-France, Amazon.fr //-Germany, Amazon.de // Spain, Amazon.es //-Japan, Amazon.jp

Level Up Conference in KL 2018: Report

Last week I had the chance to attend the famous Level Up conference in Kuala Lumpur.

The atmosphere at Level Up was truly electrifying. Seeing all these youngsters showing their artistic creations was absolutely marvellous.

The conference talks were held by a plethora of speakers from a wide range of backgrounds within the gaming, digital art, software and hardware industries.

I found particularly interesting the presentation given by HTC regarding VR and their future intentions for the new technology. The speech was quite technical but luckily I had gone to a VR lab the week prior to Level Up to try it out as I wrote in my previous article. My first experience was quite…..hilarious. If you’re interested in seeing a ridiculous girl pretending to ski in VR and falling by herself, click here to watch the video.

A disappointment, however, arises from the lack of debate regarding the ‘side effects’ of VR.

We do not know how the human psychology will react once VR is easily accessible to everyone or even a future commonly found at home tech, like they all seemed to predict at Level Up. Controversial studies have been carried out and subsequent correlations have already been found between violent videogames and real life aggression. And this was with 2D on screen games, so what’s it going to be with VR games? And we also have lots of cases of gaming addiction, particularly in Asia where bootcamps are held for rehab from technology. So what’s going to happen with VR in the mix too?

I loved some of the games that were exhibited and was mesmerised by the new Prestige range of MSI laptops. In fact, I am very tempted to buy the P42: such a powerful laptop and yet so thin and light. A masterpiece truly. If you’re interested, you can have a look at its features here. After all, both 11.11 and Black Friday/CyberMonday are getting close so we won’t feel to guilty to buy a new toy if it’s discounted!

So all in all, the success of Level Up is totally justified. It was well organised, the location very neat and pleasant, the crowd quite varied and the speakers capable.

But to me, the best of Level Up was seeing so many young minds attending, each showing a great passion and a strong will to succeed in an increasingly competitive environment like gaming, apps and digital art.

In a way a contradictory but also reassuring observation I made was that several of these digital talents were still sketching on paper all the time, even during talks. It is nice to see that art evolves but the starting point remains traditional: the hand sketch.

VR, my first time: amazing but disturbing

I live in Kuala Lumpur and at this time of the year the monsoon hits us hard especially during the afternoons and evenings. The rain floods streets and the humid heat renders the air stale and tiring.

So what to do on a Saturday night in this weather? Go to spend an hour at the VR lab.

Last Saturday was my first time (VR-wise) and my boyfriend suggested a ski game to, as he put it, ‘experience fully the power of VR‘. Sure. Why not.

As I was ‘experiencing fully’ the thing, he decided to film me in one of the most ridiculous moments of my young life. You can see it too here.

In conclusion, I found VR to be an extrordinary thing. It’s incredible how effectively real everything feels. I say feels and not looks, as it’s not the graphics that make you believe you’re in other dimension. It’s the whole interaction between the visual illusion and your brain that drives you nuts.

I did feel nausea when jumping on my skis, scared when some snakes tried to eat me, tired after a pub fight and I had a strong headache afterward. But it was totally worth a try and I will likely go again some time.

Yet, I cannot prevent myself from thinking about the potential consequences of VR on human psychology. Using it an hour at an arcade is no biggie but VR will likely become more and more affordable and am sure a good portion of the population will end up having it at home, always accessible.
Controversial studies and correlations have already been made regarding violent screen-videogames and real life aggression. And we also have lots of cases of gaming addiction, particularly in Asia where bootcamps are also held for rehab from technology. So what’s going to happen with VR in the mix too? How many individuals will prefer the virtual reality they build themselfves to their actual lives?

How many people who may already be prone to addicition, violence or psychological trouble will lose their minds with VR?

This is not a criticism. I leave these questions open as I am clueless of what’s going to happen. Yet, I do find that these questions are not asked enough.

Next week I’ll go to the Level Up Conference in KL and hope to find some answers.