If you want to build your art collection, you should do so in an intelligent manner. This is so that everything you buy for your collection wouldn’t be considered as a waste of money. However, collecting art intelligibly would require you to master two things: good research skills and the skill of collecting.

Starting On The Thought Of Collecting

Generally, as most people do, you’d probably have the knowledge of buying art on a piece-per-piece basis, yet still may not be thinking of plans like making multiple achievements as time passes by, or simply, building up a collection.

Although it is possible to find artworks that you like anywhere you go, and get to choose from an outstanding diversity of subject matters, mediums, and price ranges; doing so can still be confusing and intimidating, especially if you’re still starting.

Questions such as: “How exactly do you push your way through and choose which direction to make an entrance?” “How can you relate one buy to the other?”;”How should you group or organize your art?”; “Are there ways of presenting it?”; and lastly “How can you do everything in an excellent manner?”; may come play in your mind.

However, once you get these queries off you head then you’ll get to understand the real meaning of “collection”, which is the crucial case of controlled and purposeful buying.


The Great Collections

Great collectors are extensively respected and usually as popular as the artworks they collect; such as the Rockefeller collection, the Chrysler collection, and the Phillips collection, to name a few. Such collectors are famous since they demonstrate a great deal of talent when choosing and organizing their art, just like the artists themselves are in making the masterpiece. Similarly, each piece of art in one great collection orders first-class attention as well as a first-rate price not just because the piece is good, but also of the name of the company it bears.

If you wish to know more about the great collections, I suggest you have a look at Modern Art on Display: The Legacies of Six Collectors, by K. Porter Aichele. 

I came across this book randomly on Amazon some time ago. I liked it the moment it reached my doorstep as it looks at art collecting in the twentieth as a complex game of finance, instinct but above all knowledge and culture. In a few words, it explores the theory that collectors of modern art in the first half of the twentieth century had more than financial means, keen instincts, and unflappable gumption: they had the ambition to learn about the art they collected.

How Great Is ‘Great’?

So how exactly do great collectors become great? Well, experts believe that it is this skill of being able to categorize specific artworks from the billions of works existing and assemble them in such a manner aiming to advance or increase other’s understanding of such particular art or of art’s evolution in general.

For any kind of mature collection, the whole thing, as a group, becomes greater than the value of the parts. Thus, the collector becomes accepted to be a respected authority in the matter and in outstanding cases continues until he’s the one that sets the standards, establishes the trends, and influences the future of art collecting for all.

This is how meaningful and influencing great art collections can be. It all starts from a single piece of art, until the whole collection itself becomes a separate artwork from its components.

If the topic of how collectors influence the value of art and how fortunes are made in the market of fine art interest you, I recommend this book: FINE ART AND HIGHT FINANCE by Clare McAndrew. This reading opened to me a massive window on what is nowadays known as ‘The Art Economy’ and enriched me with useful insights on valuation, trend and marketing in the almost impenetrable world of fine art.


The First Step To Greatness: art needs you as much as you need art

No matter how you see your collecting, whether recreational or serious, there are methods that you could use to get the most out of not only the value and quality of your art, but also your personal appreciation, enjoyment, and understanding of your art.

Thus, you should know that your first step to greatness is being real to your tastes. If you want to be a really great collector someday, then acknowledging and accepting that you like specific types of art without considering what other people say or what is popular in the market, would be the right thing to do.

Remember, in collecting, you’re making an artwork too which is composed of different specific pieces. How you’ll design your artwork is entirely up to you and not what other people think. So if you’ll be collecting , be sure to put your heart on it! And who knows…maybe your instinct and taste will lead you to purchase the future Picasso…

Nicholas Tan; Victoria Schaal

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PhotoReportage: Luca Camuffo – Roman Dance (Eng&Ita)

La settimana scorsa sono stata a Roma per alcuni giorni dove ho incontrato il mio amico d’infanzia Luca Camuffo, che ora è un artista e un ballerino fresco di Accademia Nazionale. Mi ha lasciato fotografarlo mentre danzava sulla riva del Tevere nonostante i 39 gradi sotto il sole! Potete vedere le foto qui sotto.

Sebbene le sue origini siano veneziane, Luca vive a Roma da anni. Ha frequentato il Centro Elaborazione Danza di Laura Sgaragli, l’Accademia Nazionale di Danza di Roma e ha anche partecipato alle residenze artistiche del Premio MAB.

Dal 2012 collabora a progetti di artisti di fama internazionale (Andrea Morucchio, Lukas Bures, Katia Della Fonte) sperimentando le possibilità del corpo in spazi non convenzionali, unendo fotografia, video e bodypainting.

Per contattare Luca Camuffo, ecco la sua e-mail: lc.camuffo@gmail.com

Last week I was in Rome for a few days and I had the chance to meet my childhood friend Luca Camuffo who is now a popular artist, dancer and performer. He let me shoot him while dancing on the bank of the Tiber despite the 39 degrees under the sun! Have a look at the pics below.

Although his origins are Venetian, Luca has been living in Rome for years, where he attended the ‘Centro Elaborazione Danza’ of Laura Sgaragli, the National Academy of Dance and also participated in the artistic residencies of the MAB Prize.

Since 2012 Luca has collaborated on projects with international artists, such as Andrea Morucchio, Lukas Bures, Katia Della Fonte,  experimenting with the human’s body infinite potential, combining photography, videography and bodypainting.

If you’d like to contact him, drop an email here: lc.camuffo@gmail.com


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Creative Block? Try Hypnosis

Do you ever have a creative block? You know … Those days when you feel completely uninspired… when you spent so many hours on a chair that your butt has become square shaped and all you produced is good enough to wipe off your desk the stains of those dozens of coffees or glasses of red wine you had to fuel your imagination?!

If you say no, you’re no real creative. If you say yes, then welcome to the club.

Now… I know some solve this problem with procrastination. ‘Today’s no good. I’ll just leave it till tomorrow‘. And fair enough, it’s generally a good choice. But sometimes you have deadlines and projects and expectations and clients and so on… so you gotta produce something and it better be good!

So what can you do? To some people a nice walk in the outdoors does the trick, I know of many who get liquid inspiration from a bottle while some prefer a brief one-to-one with Maryjane..

But these don’t always work and some are not very healthy either.

There’s a healthier way to get inspired. Don’t get high on substances, get high on your brain.

If you’ve never practised meditation, it is time for you to try. Yeah I know, the title of this post is hypnosis. But you see, you always need to start with a little meditation to be able to advance to hypnosis.

Meditation sounds easy and in fact it actually is at its most basic level, which is achieving relaxation. However, meditation can be used for more complex achievements such as coping with grief or trauma, overcoming phobias, suppressing addictions, and much much more, like problem solving.

Creative blocks can be huge problems, especially when you’re on a tight deadline and your boss is prepping a firing round.

You can solve such an issue with a meditation that focuses on the problem you have. The broad explanation of how it works starts with total relaxation. For a brief time you will allow yourself to relax physically and mentally, letting go of all thoughts and issues and emotional interference. After you have cleared your mind, you will see how easy it’ll be to focus on just the one problem you have, without stress.

Like most things in life, the more you practice meditation, the more effective the experience will be. It’s easier to start with short meditations ranging from 5 to 20 minutes. When you get more experienced you’ll manage to meditate for longer.

Auto-hypnosis is harder, although I noticed that the beginner’s luck is common. Many people told me that the first time they tried to auto-hypnotise themselves, it worked and they had amazing experiences. It was the same for me, the first time was astounding and seemed rather easy peasy to me. Yet, I was wrong. It took me several attempts before I managed to enter in a hypnotic state again. But this didn’t stop me from trying and it shouldn’t worry you either.

Not entering in the hypnotic state is no biggie, failure simply translates to a deep meditative experience or a simple short doze. Both are refreshing experiences and both can unleash your clogged creative juice.

You may try to meditate on your own. However, auto-hypnosis without any external help requires a lot of experience and skill. It’s for pros really.

What I use are guided meditations and hypnosis sessions with specific videos.

There’s a plethora on YouTube. You can choose the ones you like based on what you want to achieve and your experience level. An expert on YouTube is Michael Sealey whose videos are all over the hypnotic and meditative categories. However, there are many others who are equally good.

Here below I embedded two videos I really like and that work on me.

The first is a meditation and I highly recommend it to newbies and those of you who have a particularly stressful time.

The second is a hypnotic session. I chose it because I found it quite effective on me and rather easy to focus on.

However, if these don’t work out for you, have a look yourself. As I said there are thousands of good guided sessions on YouTube. And above all, please don’t give up on it if it doesn’t work perfectly at your first attempt. You can’t just go to the Olympics and expect to win a gold medal straight away. You need practice and training.

Happy meditation 🙂 and let us know how it went on the comments!

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Famous blogger Rachel Lerch interviews Victoria Schaal on stock photography industry

I had the privilege to be interviewed by Rachel Lerch, a now famous blogger and vlogger who fascinates every week her thousands of subscribers and viewers with her enriching videos about photography. Naturally Rachel has talked several times about stock photography as well.

Thus, it was a pleasure for me to participate in her latest video and answer all her questions about the industry with my knowledge and insights from when I was Marketing Exec at 123RF.   

You may see the video below.

I also strongly recommend Rachel Lerch’s other videos, which I find extremely useful to improve photography skills and highly engaging. Rachel also has a beautiful website where you can see her work and read her blog.

You can visit it here: https://rachellerch.com/2019/08/10/stock-photography-employee-shares-inside-scoop-how-to-be-successful/

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